APS Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology



Reward / Motivated Feeding: Why We Override Our Satiation Signals

Featured Topic — Monday, April 4, 2022 — 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM — Convention Center, Room 204C
Endocrinology and Metabolism Section — Chair: Willis Samson — Co-Chair: Elizabeth Mietlicki-Baase

It is clear that the excessive food intake, especially of palatable foods, that contributes to human obesity is not driven by metabolic need alone. While our lab investigates the importance of neuropeptide signaling on vagal afferents and in hindbrain and hypothalamic nuclei for the homeostatic control of food intake, it is also critical to examine and better define the neural basis of non-homeostatic controls of food intake. Ongoing extensive investigations in our lab are examining the neuroendocrine systems that connect within-meal inhibitory feedback from gastrointestinal satiation signals to nuclei in the mesolimbic reward system (MRS), including the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens. Activation of the MRS by these neuroendocrine systems is postulated to decrease motivation to continue feeding, leading to meal termination. Thus, current projects are investigating the behavioral, molecular, neuronal and physiological mechanisms by which energy balance -relevant neuropeptides (such as glucagon-like peptide-1, leptin and amylin) are modulating the non-homeostatic controls of feeding mediated by nuclei in the MRS.

Speakers

  • Introduction 
    Willis Samson — Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, Saint Louis University
    8:30 AM - 8:35 AM

  • Reward / Motivated Feeding: Why We Override Our Satiation Signals
    Matthew Hayes — Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine
    8:35 AM - 9:05 AM

  • Close
    Elizabeth Mietlicki-Baase — Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, University of Buffalo
    9:55 AM - 10:00 AM




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