APS Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology



The Physiology of Amylin Receptors and of Amylin Responsive Neurons

Symposium — Sunday, April 3, 2022 — 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM — Convention Center, Room 204C
Endocrinology and Metabolism Section — Chair: Thomas Lutz — Co-Chair: Tune Pers

Surgical therapy of obesity is efficacious at producing and maintaining weight loss, but it is also associated with some undesired metabolic effects and it can only be offered to a small proportion of the obese population. Hence, pharmacotherapy of obesity remains a highly desired clinical option, and therapy based on gastrointestinal hormones such as amylin is a most promising avenue for such pharmacotherapy. The pancreatic beta-cell hormone amylin which is co-released with insulin is an important control of nutrient fluxes. Amylin’s most prominent physiological action is to control of meal size. Amylin also sensitizes the brain to leptin action, is involved in modulating the reward properties of food and it influences brain development. The three known amylin receptors 1-3 consists of the calcitonin core receptor (CTR) and receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMP) 1, 2 or 3, resp. RAMPs determine CTR specificity and affinity for amylin, and recent studies indicate specific amylin actions mediated by certain amylin receptor subtypes. RAMPs are also modulators of other G-protein coupled receptors. In this symposium, we will discuss the latest findings of the amylin receptor characteristics and the specific properties of amylin responsive cells in particular in the caudal hindbrain. The latter data also indicate that amylin responsive neurons may be implicated in the predisposition to obesity. The last presentation will summarize the various physiological and pathophysiological actions and sites of action in the amylin-mediated control of eating, body weight and metabolism.

Speakers

  • Introduction
    Thomas Lutz — Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich
    8:30 AM - 8:35 AM

  • Amylin Receptor Physiology and Their Role in Metabolic Disease
    Debbie Hay — Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago
    8:35 AM - 9:00 AM

  • Genetic characterization of amylin receptive neurons
    Tune Pers — Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen
    9:00 AM - 9:25 AM

  • Physiological control of metabolism by amylin
    Thomas Lutz — Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zurich
    9:25 AM - 9:50 AM

  • Close
    Tune Pers — Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen
    9:50 AM - 10:00 AM




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